Ремикс

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Реми́кс (англ. Re-mix) — версия музыкального произведения, записанная позже оригинальной версии. Концепция ремиксов, как свойства современной культуры, активно используется в дизайне современных сетевых сообществ.

Принцип ремиксов активно используют различные платформы:


Remixing is creating your own version of someone else's movie, usually incorporating elements from the original and adding content or maybe just some of your own style and spicy goodness. It's an easy way to get started, and you can do it with the click of a button on any published movie. When you click \Remix," we'll pull back the curtain and show you what's behind the scenes. Then you can get busy being creative. Don't worry, you're not destroying someone else's work, you're just making your own copy. And if yours is better than the original, so be it. The community will tell you.

См. Принципы дизайна сетевых сообществ


Practice: Reusing and remixing

Building on other people’s work has been a longstanding practice in programming, and has only been amplified by network technologies that provide access to a wide range of other people’s work to reuse and remix. One goal of the Scratch online community is to support young designers in reusing and remixing, by helping them find ideas and code to build upon, enabling them to potentially create things much more complex than they could have created on their own. Reusing and remixing support the development of critical code-reading capacities and provoke important questions about ownership and authorship. What is reasonable to borrow from others? How do you give appropriate credit to others? How do you assess cooperative and collaborative work? Renita’s project benefitted from reuse and remixing in at least two ways. The project idea was a remix of a project she had first seen on a popular gaming website, and later found on the Scratch website


Культура ремиксов

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Remix of learning activity

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